Undescribed image
The Innovative Health Initiative (IHI)

Health Innovators, are you ready? Innovative Health Initiative launches Calls for Proposals #6 and #7  

Undescribed image
The MedTech Forum

Registrations for the MedTech Forum 2024 are open!

Undescribed image
MedTech ON AIR

New season of MedTech ON AIR podcast, first episode with CEO Oliver Bisazza

Undescribed image
European Union

MedTech Europe Manifesto for 2024 – 2029 | Empowering Patients, Inspiring Innovation

Undescribed image
Connecting the Dots

Wacth season 2 of 'Connecting the Dots'!

Undescribed image
Market Data

Check out the Facts & Figures 2023 report!

Undescribed image

MedTech Europe Code of Ethical Business Practice

R&I

Interested in finding out how your medical technology company can participate in the Innovative Health Initiative (IHI)?

Undescribed image
R&I

Start-ups & Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs) can now apply as Partners in Research

  • 01
  • 02
  • 03
  • 04
  • 05
  • 06
  • 07
  • 08
  • 09

/ 09

Latest updates

Resource library

The draft text of the European Health Data Space (EHDS) in trilogues sparks deep concerns in the European healthcare ecosystem

MedTech Europe, as part of a coalition of 35 large health stakeholder organisations representing patients, health professionals, researchers and industrial actors in the healthcare ecosystem at both European Union (EU) and Member State level, is expressing its shared concerns about the latest negotiations on the proposed Regulation on the European Health Data Space (EHDS). Read the full statement below.

Posted on 26.02.2024

Read more More resources
Resource library

How medical technology is bridging the accessibility gap

From plasters and pregnancy tests to ultrasound scans and prosthetics medical technology plays a vital role in our day-to-day lives. But how can new technologies make the world accessible to more people? For people who need audio, visual, neurological and physical support to live independently, their specific needs can sometimes be missed in daily life, and they can be met with challenges using technologies which can fail to accommodate them. However, the medical technology industry is taking on the task of meeting those needs. From virtual reality (VR) headsets that assist in therapy and treatment, to bionic prosthetics that mimic the movements of limbs and joints, the advances being made in the sector are extraordinary. Hugh Herr, a professor of media arts and sciences at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Media Lab, and co-leader of the K Lisa Yang Center for Bionics at MIT in the US, is one such pioneer. As a double amputee, he brings personal experience to his engineering and champions accessibility for those who need prosthetics. Two years ago, he and his team at the Center started a programme in Sierra Leone to strengthen the capabilities and services of the country’s orthotic and prosthetic sector. “The Center aims to address the consequences of the civil war in Sierra Leone, where tens of thousands of people are grappling with limb loss,” Herr says. “Our comprehensive approach involves the creation of essential infrastructure, the development of robust supply chains, and the implementation of education technology to tackle the significant accessibility challenges in the region.” The costs to make this happen are incredibly high, says Herr, which can be a barrier for people in countries like Sierra Leone who can lack money for basic necessities. The average wage in the country is 745,625 leone per month ($40/£32). But he is optimistic that the initiative started by the Centre will have a long-lasting impact in the region. Herr is one of many examples of entrepreneurs improving the accessibility of patient care beyond clinical settings. Dopavision, founded by Hamed Bahmani, started with a primary focus to create a solution for people with myopia, a type of short-sightedness. The condition occurs when the eyeball is too long relative to the focusing power of the cornea and lens of the eye. “We are developing an intervention which uses VR headsets and light stimulation which aims to prevent excessive eyeball growth that is associated with it,” Bahmani explains. “We wanted to deliver the treatment via a device that is accessible and doesn’t interrupt the daily life of a patient.” The method behind Dopavision’s VR, which is powered by an application called MyopiaX, involves the application of light to proteins in the retina, to release dopamine to compensate for the lack of dopamine produced in a myopic eye. “We’re currently engaging in a clinical trial, using a combination of a smartphone and a VR goggle headset to assess the clinical effect of MyopiaX to treat children with myopia,” Bahmani explains. “This treatment has the potential to stop the progression of myopia in children, addressing a significant medical need. With myopia affecting a third of the global population and projected to impact half by 2050, it’s offering a crucial intervention to combat the condition’s serious medical implications.” Combining mindfulness, psychology and AI technology, the cognitive health app Mindstep is a tool to empower users to seek help for their mental wellbeing. “Mindstep started out really as an experiment to see if the technology we have available is at the level where we, as doctors, feel comfortable managing patients remotely or safely,” says Hamzah Selim, a doctor in the UK and Mindstep founder. “We’ve provided it to so many people, enabling them to access mental health resources from anywhere, addressing challenges such as mobility issues and social anxiety.” Utilising technology and pairing it with the team’s medical knowledge and expertise is helping the app grow, with 86% of users who use Mindstep seeing a benefit to their cognitive or mental health, according to data sourced from an internal survey and shown to the BBC. “AI is now allowing us to do what we set out to do, and really personalise and understand the nuances of every single individual and give them a really bespoke treatment,” Selim says. “Generative AI will make medical technology developments a two-way stream, allowing AI to output personalised information back to the individual. This is really exciting if done correctly, as it enables a new level of interaction and customisation in patient care.” The app (which comes with a monthly fee) is not yet widely endorsed by the NHS – but NHS doctors have expressed to Selim how useful it has been to them and their patients. The team ​​hope to have an NHS pathway up and running by early 2024. VR can be used to raise awareness among neurotypical individuals about the challenges faced by neurodivergent people in workspaces, says Rachel Lowy, a PhD student at the Georgia Institute of Technology, who has been researching accessible technologies using her expertise as a speech-language pathologist. “We partnered directly with neurodivergent people and neurotypical people who had worked with [VR], to ask, how should this technology be designed? What kinds of things can we show?” Lowy says.   Recognising the diversity within neurodivergent groups is crucial – Rachel Lowy Current technologies often focus on simulating disabilities, but Rachel advocates for showcasing the capabilities and ingenuity that neurodivergent individuals bring. “Recognising the diversity within neurodivergent groups is crucial. One size does not fit all, and each person may have unique strengths, interests and ways of approaching challenges. For example, someone who has been blind their entire life has developed a lot of creativity around how they get around the world. We could use that knowledge in development.” Lowy says. “There’s a lot in the disability world, where instead of taking what we call a medical model of disability, where we see people as broken and needing fixing, we could move forward with a social model of disability, which acknowledges the societal barriers faced by those with different brains and bodies. The focus should be on understanding and accommodating individuals’ needs rather than assuming deficits that need correction.” This shift from assessing and fixing what is ‘broken’ and instead accommodating individuals’ needs, will hopefully in time be integrated into traditional healthcare practices, she says.   We believe it’s crucial to evolve medical technology holistically – Kevin Esmezyan “We believe it’s crucial to evolve medical technology into a more holistic category, addressing various accessibility needs,” agrees Kevin Esmezyan, the founder of Spectrums AI, a startup focused on implementing AI to help people with neurodevelopmental conditions, such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention-deficit/hyperactive disorder (ADHD), become more independent and autonomous. “We monitor, analyse and understand where and when people need help, enabling caregivers to be notified and share information more effectively.” Esmezyan understands the responsibility to find a solution for people marginalised by their impairment. With technological advances continuing to evolve, medical technology has the potential to not just aid but to empower those living with specific needs.

Posted on 14.02.2024

Read more More resources
Resource library

Joint statement supporting the expansion of the use of Electronic Instructions For Use in the medical devices sector

MedTech Europe, together with 11 organisations, asks the Medical Device Coordination Group (MDCG) to consider the scope extension of Commission Implementing Regulation (EU) 2021/2226 on electronic Instructions for Use (eIFU) a priority for 2024. Expanding a scope of this regulation via a targeted update will allow for a level playing field, help equity of access to medical devices across the EU and thereby support efficient MDR implementation. To read more about our ask – allowing all medical devices used by healthcare professionals to be accompanied by IFU in an electronic format – please consult our latest position paper here: Electronic Instructions for Use for all professional use Medical Devices: MedTech Europe calls for scope expansion of EU 2021/2226 – position paper – MedTech Europe

Posted on 05.02.2024

Read more More resources

Uniting for change on Rare Disease Day

It’s been a long but rewarding journey for Iuliana Dumitriu, whose 9-year-old son Victor has a rare genetic disorder called Coffin-Lowry syndrome. Now she’s helping other families by connecting them and raising awareness around the world.

Undescribed image

Empowering patients will boost the quality of healthcare

Across Europe, campaigning is underway ahead of June’s European Parliament elections. This marks the beginning of a new chapter in the cycle of EU decision-making and offers us all a moment to take stock.

Undescribed image

About us

MedTech Europe is the European trade association representing the medical technology industries, from diagnosis to cure.

We represent Diagnostics and Medical Devices manufacturers operating in Europe. There are more than 500,000 products, services and solutions currently made available by the medical technology industry. These range from bandages, blood tests and hearing aids to cancer screening tests, pacemakers and glucose monitors.

Our sector employs more than 730,000 people. There are more than 32,000 medical technology companies in Europe, of which 95% are SMEs.

Undescribed image

What we work on

Medical Technology Regulations

Medical Technology Regulations

Medical technologies are tightly regulated in the European Union. Before a medical technology can be legally placed on the EU market, a manufacturer must comply with the requirements of all applicable EU legislation and affix a CE mark to their device.

New EU Regulations governing medical devices (MD) and in vitro diagnostic (IVD) were published in May 2017. MedTech Europe is working with our members and the authorities to support companies in complying with the new legislation by the end of the transition periods – 2021 for MDs and 2022 for IVDs.

The European Neighbourhood

Access to Medical Technology

Access to Medical Technology

Medical technologies have the potential to save and improve the quality of life, to inform people on the state of their health and to guide healthcare delivery.

Access to medical technology picture

Interactions with the Medical Community

Interactions with the Medical Community

The medical technology industry is expected to act in a responsible manner. MedTech Europe and its members are committed to a high level of ethical business practices and have put in place strict guidelines to advise medical technology manufacturers on how to collaborate ethically with Healthcare Professionals (HCPs), Healthcare Organisations (HCOs) and Patient Organisations (POs).

Interactions with the Medical Community Picture

COVID-19 Information Hub

COVID-19 Information Hub

As the spread of the coronavirus COVID-19 continues to impact the health of people and the economy of countries around the world, the medical technology industry is working to support all ongoing efforts against this pandemic.

Undescribed image

Privacy, Liability and Collective Redress

Privacy, Liability and Collective Redress

MedTech Europe engages with members and EU stakeholders on key topics such as privacy, liability and collective redress. The reason for this engagement stems from the fact that medical technology companies doing business in Europe are subject to a host of legislation they comply with.

Undescribed image

Market Data

Market Data

Taking decisions based on individual knowledge and market understanding has proven to be insufficient in the digital era. Successful medical technology companies have leveraged the power of technology and big data to take rigorous decisions based on empirical data. Staying up to date with the latest trends, requires a trusted data provider and market intelligence service.

Business stats displayed as graph and chart on a futuristic interface - Business concept

Environmental and Social Sustainability

Environmental and Social Sustainability

In addition to the medical technology sector’s core goal of saving lives and improving health, environmental and social considerations are an integral part of our industry’s operations. We acknowledge that preserving a healthy environment and building socially responsible value chains are essential in keeping human beings in good health. Our industry needs to be at the forefront of addressing challenges related to sustainable healthcare.

Environmental sustainability picture

Digital Health

Digital Health

Medical technologies generate information and data that are critical for the prevention, diagnosis, treatment, monitoring and management of health and lifestyle. This data can be stored and accessed on electronic health records and personal devices, shared among patients and healthcare professionals, aggregated and processed with advanced data analytics.

Digital Picture

International

International

MedTech Europe engages with global agencies, decision-makers and stakeholders on key international issues facing medical technology companies.

International Picture

Innovative Health Initiative (IHI)

Innovative Health Initiative (IHI)

The Innovative Health Initiative (IHI) is a public-private partnership between the European Union and the European life science industries, under the EU R&I funding programme Horizon Europe.

Undescribed image

Research and Innovation

Research and Innovation

Research & Innovation (R&I) is the lifeblood of Europe’s medical technology sector. Industry investment in R&I delivers life-enhancing devices, diagnostics, and digital solutions. The European Union’s support for R&I offers valuable opportunities for academia and industry to generate new knowledge and use it to tackle the biggest challenges facing our societies. The quest for tomorrow’s healthcare innovations demands new, broad partnerships. R&I is most impactful when it is based on collaboration. MedTech Europe is committed to working with others in the public and private sectors to find solutions to our challenges.

Research and Innovation

Ophthalmology

Ophthalmology

Vision loss can have a profound impact on those affected, resulting in lost independence and significantly limiting daily activities. Ageing increases the risk of eye diseases that can lead to visual impairment. The medical technology industry develops products that reduce the burden of eye disease on individuals, families and the wider economy. These innovations add enormous value to European society.

concept vision testing. child girl with eyeglasses

Homecare & Community Care

Homecare & Community Care

The medical technology sector develops products, services and solutions aimed at delivering care in the community setting and in people's homes. These technologies are convenient for patients, improve their quality of life and can save lives, while being an efficient use of healthcare resources.

Homecare and community care

Cardiovascular

Cardiovascular

Cardiovascular diseases, including heart failure, atrial fibrillation-related stroke, heart valve disease or coronary heart disease, can impact people of all ages and remain the leading cause of death in the European Union.

The medical technology industry provides high-quality solutions to safeguard and promote cardiovascular health and reduce the burden of cardiovascular diseases on individuals, families, and the wider society.

Cardiovascular Picture

Orthopaedic

Orthopaedic

Orthopaedics is the medical specialty that focuses on injuries and diseases of the human body's musculoskeletal system. This complex system includes bones; joints; ligaments; tendons; muscles; and nerves; and allows you to move, work, and stay active.

The medical technology industry develops products that reduce the burden of musculoskeletal diseases on individuals, families, and the wider economy. These innovations improve quality of life and add enormous value to the European society.

Image of concentrated disabled athlete woman

Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) and Healthcare Associated Infections (HAIS)

Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) and Healthcare Associated Infections (HAIS)

Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) and Healthcare Associated Infections (HAI) are among the biggest global public health challenges of our time. These infections cause significant morbidity and mortality, put pressure on health systems, and incur rising direct and indirect costs.
Medical technologies can help to address these problems by preventing, detecting, monitoring and managing infections and resistance.

Pathogen growth on selective media.

Cancer

Cancer

Medical technologies play an essential role throughout the whole cancer continuum: they help prevent and detect cancer at early stages, treat patients and prevent treatment complications, as well as improve the quality of life of cancer patients and survivors.

Undescribed image

Diabetes

Diabetes

Diabetes is a silent pandemic. There are 60 million people across Europe living with the condition—equivalent to the population of Italy – and the numbers are rising each year. If current trends continue, diabetes will soon be the number one health threat in Europe.

The MedTech Europe Diabetes Group aims to reverse this trend by taking meaningful collective action on prevention, diagnosis and treatment for the millions of people living with diabetes, so that they can get back to leading full and fear-free lives.

Diabetes Picture